Positivity on Fire

Grace, Positivity & Support with Mike Cobb

September 18, 2021 Jason Ramsden / Mike Cobb Episode 35
Positivity on Fire
Grace, Positivity & Support with Mike Cobb
Show Notes Transcript

We’ve become accustomed to using a GPS when we get lost on America’s roads and highways but what if we start using GPS as a way to guide our daily lives? What if we started to offer grace, positivity, and support in all our daily interactions? What if it became our mantra like it is for today’s guest, Mike Cobb.

In today’s episode, host Jason Ramsden has a conversation with Mike Cobb, Head of School at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler, Texas. A fascinating leader with a compelling philosophy focused on G.P.S. - grace, positivity, and support, Mike gives us a glimpse into how G.P.S. works at his school with faculty, students, and parents and also shares some impactful lessons along the way.

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EP19: Chatter;The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It
EP04: The 5 Second Rule: Transform your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage by Mel Robbins
EP02: Find Your Why by Simon Sinek (audio version)

Mike Cobb:

And I started pondering it that moment like, wow, wouldn't it be great if everyone in our lives had that same grace, positivity and support? And so it really began this thought for me about as teachers, but beyond that as people, how can we offer grace positive support always.

Jason Ramsden:

Hi, I'm Jason Ramsden and I believe we can all work on leading a more positive and intentional life. And this show details my journey by sharing my learning stories and conversations with guests. If you want to lead a more intentional life, focus on being the best you possible. Please subscribe today. Now, let's get into today's episode. Hello, my positivity posse and welcome to another episode of positivity on fire. Today I am happy to share with you my interview with Mike Cobb, Head of School at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler, Texas. Mike is a fascinating leader with a compelling philosophy focused on G p. s. Grace, positivity and support. And in today's episode, you'll get a glimpse into how GPS works at Mike's school, as well as some impactful lessons for the students. I hope you enjoy today's show. Well, hello, Mike. Rob, as I say down path. It's been a minute.

Mike Cobb:

Good to see y'all. I reckon that that's some other Texas slang I can throw out now. Everything is great. It's great to be with you today.

Jason Ramsden:

Well, I'm glad to have you. Good to see in person. It's been a while since we've we've connected. I would love for you to tell my listeners a little bit about who you are and what you do.

Mike Cobb:

Absolutely. Well, I'm Mike Cobb. And I'm currently the Head of School at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler, Texas. That is just the east of Dallas and beautiful piney woods. And we are a school that has three rows through grade 12. And we have about 700 students on on campus on 150 acre campus that we've been able to really leverage some really great outdoor learning and really focusing on authentic learning student agency. And beyond that I married to a wonderful woman who is a teacher too. So that's what's kept me going all along. And I have a daughter who's 23, who's just jumped out into the adult world. So that's been a fun adventure as well getting to experience that point of life with her.

Jason Ramsden:

As you know, we probably have a lot in common, right, you know, having done 30 years of education, my wife is a brand new head of school. So she's living that head of school life like you are and I have two kids 23 and 21. ones just graduated college getting ready to get out there themselves. And the other one getting ready to go back this week for senior year. Wow. It's that time of year right. All schools are getting ready to be fired up and, and moving on.

Mike Cobb:

Absolutely. Yeah, you know, it's been such a blessing for me to get to enjoy watching so many families go through the learning process and the journey, but then also as a father getting to watch it. Now on the other end, I didn't always get to know all the next steps for our students, you know, we stay in contact, but you don't see them as intimate as you do while they're with you. But watching it through my daughter's eyes, I have a deeper appreciation for what it looks like after they leave our schools now.

Jason Ramsden:

I love that I really like being able to see kids move on progress, do the things they were meant to do in life. It's It's so exciting, not only just for our own kids, you know, as parents, but also for the kids that we know that have been through our schools that we may have stayed connected to. I think it says a lot about the types of schools we work in, or I've worked in, where the kids feel really comfortable about staying connected back to the institution and the people that were in the institution. I'm curious because your school is I think it on your website says it's one of inquiry innovation and impact. Mike, what I'm really want to dive into is the impact part because that's a part of what I believe in, how does that live out day to day in the school life for you?

Mike Cobb:

Yeah, you know, that is been really my passion for a long time is that, you know, I talk a lot about authentic learning and student agency, but that if you are attempting to have those two things, but there's no impact from a learning, there's no next step that I don't really believe you can have authentic learning. And you certainly don't have kids that want to agency because there's no relevancy, there's no importance in what they're learning or what they're going to do with it. And so for us, and every single grade level, at every age, our students are challenged to whatever you're learning now, how can you do something with that to impact the world? And not just the kind of impact that you hear often worse, like when I grow up kind of statements, but no right now, what can you do? You know, we have students that are building prosthetic devices for people all over the world. We have a group that does makers on a mission where they work with UT Tyler here in East Texas to build assistive technologies for people that need them. And then we have things like our kids are chicken farmers in second grade that are actually nurturing and nourishing our chickens. To sell eggs and carpool that help bring about sustainable food. And so really helping students today learn they can actually have an impact is vital, I think to have a truly authentic experience for our students that will make them leaders that are prepared for the future.

Jason Ramsden:

So how does that obviously, they're impacting the world around them, whether it's local, or in the state, or else elsewhere. What is the impact back on them as kids and their developmental learning?

Mike Cobb:

Huge. I mean, you know, I think again, that that when you're able to help a student, one, understand that what they know or they're learning is relevant, we talk about a lot about moving from learning to knowing by doing that, once you do that, then you are going to see the relevancy and you're going to want to intrinsically know more, I tell you a great story. A student named jet who was a great musician had been used in some of our Fab Lab resources, but really cared more about music was in the recording studio way more, and he was using the 3d printers. But he developed a problem with his hand where when he was strumming for long gigs, he couldn't grip the guitar pick anymore. So he decided he was going to figure out how to solve his problem, he created this really cool device that held the guitar pick that you didn't have to have grip strength, it basically went through your hands like a ring. That was pretty cool. And he solved his own problem. He then decided to get a patent for it. And then he got recognized the newspaper. Well, this older gentleman named Charlie saw his picture on the cover of the paper. And he called in and Charlie was almost 80 years old, had played the banjo his whole life but hadn't played for the last two years, because he had crippling arthritis. And so he came in and he met with jet and jet sized him for it and one of these devices that allowed him to play the banjo again. And like I watched that moment, and I still get chills talking about now because I watched jet, his whole countenance changed. And I I knew at that moment, that jet was going to be chasing that for the rest of his life. Right? I want to I want to learn something that I can know and then do something with it has impact on the world. I no longer had to give jet any external motivators for why he might want to do something, he had the intrinsic desire to know and do more.

Jason Ramsden:

That's absolutely amazing. And I'm a big believer in impact one or impact 1 million, there's no difference. Absolutely, nearly jet has impacted one person, probably more than that, but one that was able to come forward and let y'all know, and then get involved in the school. And that in and of itself is going to, I think probably or has probably changed jets whole perception about the learning by doing.

Mike Cobb:

Absolutely. And, again, it has this ripple effect, right? I mean, certainly, like you say, he's impacting Charlie and others, but then also you watch that, like, it's impacted me, right. I'm an I'm an old guy, but watching jet has inspired me to want to learn and know and then do more, right. And that's what we can all hope for. For I agree with you that it's whether it's one or a million, the impact, you have no idea what that's going to be. But we have to move our schools away from these external motivators that are bringing extrinsic extrinsic reasons for kids to do it, that they don't connect to right and that unfortunately, too many schools are still programmed under that system. And we have to realize that we have to change the way we think about what our kids are learning how they're expressing it, and then what they can do with it.

Jason Ramsden:

I love it. It's just kids getting inspired to learn and to have an impact. I think that speaks volumes, like what comes next in the next generation of kids. Yes, that you're doing to get kids to realize what the connection is to the real world is an important part. Now I know at all saints, one of the things you talk about is grace, positivity and support, I think you call GPS, which makes sense. Tell me more about that. I was intrigued when you had mentioned that. We were weird exchanging emails pre show

Mike Cobb:

that the idea of GPS it actually goes back a few years. When my family and I were on a road trip, we love road trips. And we were, we were driving around and we were actually driving towards the east. And I had my GPS on and I love sharing the story that my wife and I've always loved road trips. But early in our marriage, I think our marriage almost ended because of the Atlas. It was pre GPS and my wife was supposed to be the navigator not a job she signed up for, but was given and we end up in a big fight nearly every time we went to road trip, you know, because I blame the navigator. She blamed the pilot and when the first GPS came out, it was the first garment we got that had the overlays and everything right like I realized like hey, this is gonna save our marriage like we actually might make it now. And but so I have been always a kind of a front runner on the GPS as I've always tried to have that the newest, the latest and the greatest, because it's saved my marriage. So we were on this road trip though and I was using my GPS and As we were traveling, I got off track. And honestly, I just wasn't paying attention. And I missed my turn. And first of all, I reveled in the moment that I wasn't uptight or worried because I knew that mmediately it was about to recalculate. And that's what my GPS said, it said, recalculated in such a pleasant tone, and then just put me back on a new path to where we were wanting to go. And I started pondering at that moment, like, wow, wouldn't it be great if everyone in our lives had that same grace, positivity and support? Not the GPS as far as global positioning, but that, that she had grace that she didn't? She didn't start off saying, hey, why did you not listen? Are you dumb? What's going on with you? Right? She just said, recalculating in writing tone, she tells me to take a left or a right. And it was positive, and it was helpful. And then I also really started thinking about also, as we were traveling, there are many times where I needed to get gas, or we need to find some other support along the way, and I'll have to do is just tell her what I wanted. And she didn't again, get mad and say, Well, you didn't plan that at the beginning. Or why do you need that? Now, you should have got gas earlier, she just told me how to get it. And so it really began this thought for me about as teachers, but beyond that, as people, how can we offer grace positive support always there, there are times where we have students or our colleagues that get off track accidentally. And then there are sometimes they just take a left, and we tell them that you're right, they do it on purpose. But if we can offer the grace to say just recalculating, and we don't judge, we just give them the new path to go on to the journey that we're going on. And then offer the the positive tone, but also support along the way, I say often that one thing I know for sure with our students is that I don't know everything they're going to need from now until the time they graduate, it's going to be an awful lot of new things added there's going to be gas that's needed, they're going to be need support, bathroom breaks everything in between. and we have to be willing to do that. So it's become this really important mantra for us here at all saints that we're going to have GPS on. I love the idea of really powered common language, though, because we can just say it, you know, like, there are times whenever I'm about to lean into something I know, it's gonna be difficult for our team or our colleagues. And honestly, guys, we need to crank our GPS up right now today, I literally in an email said, our GPS needs to be on tilt for the next two weeks, right? Like that language, though, lets us know what what is going to be needed and what is expected. And it's just been really helpful for us to understand that. And then one last part of that for me is that I also remind folks that if you want your GPS on, you got to be a GPS to others, right? So you can't just be always receiving it, you also have to be that GPS, for those that are around you. You can't just be a receiver doesn't work that way. And so we've really focused on that over the last few years, too, if you feel like the GPS is not helping, and you don't feel the grace, Pazzini support, maybe you haven't been also given it in that that time period that you're not feeling it.

Jason Ramsden:

Common Language is such a huge part of leadership and being a leader. And so I appreciate that you bring that to the table. When you look back at this past year, everything that you had to do to get ready for last school year COVID came in March and made its way across the country. How did GPS help you last year,

Mike Cobb:

it was huge. And you know, the interesting thing I would add, though, is that it helped us as a faculty, we'd already gotten our mind around it. And and we we really use that grace, the positive support to just get through. But we also extended it to our families and our parents and I had talked to our our broader community about this, but we really hadn't really pushed it in the way that we had with our faculty is kind of that common language. But the last year, I can tell you, our families now no GPS as well, as our teachers and faculty and staff that they understand that there is no way we were going to get through the challenge that we had in front of us, unless we were willing to do that willing to offer that grace when something didn't work out quite right when we were trying to do our elearning or remote learning our to offer the positivity when we didn't have a plan. But we just we just knew we were going to have to go together and lean in you know, and then of course, the support. I mean, we had to have support from every angle this year. Without the community effort, we would not have been able to have a full school year where we were successful in our outcomes.

Jason Ramsden:

So when you look back on last year, what was the most defining moment in your life this past year?

Mike Cobb:

Wow. You know, that's a deep question. I think that there were a lot of defining moments. I don't know that I can give a moment but i can i can tell you what, what really the lesson I guess that I feel like we have learned is that one we don't have to always know the answer. As someone who's been in school a long time, but also have had been in leadership roles for many decades. You know, I think there's always this feeling that we have to have the answer and we have to be willing To say, okay, you ask the question, ask an answer. Here we go. I learned this year that that I couldn't I couldn't do that. And and what I found, though was that it was okay. I never gave a non response, but often would say that we don't know the answer to that. But here's what we're doing to try to get to that answer. Right. And, and that people were really happy with that. And so I grew as a leader in the uncertainty and you know, that what I often use the vuca term, you know, it was certainly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous this year, and that being a leader, and that meant that at times, you had to be vulnerable enough to say, we don't know, but here are the things that we're doing. And when the answer is known, we're on it. Right. So that was a big lesson for me.

Jason Ramsden:

So when you look back on that the lesson that you learn, there's Okay, you don't have to have the answer all the time. What was something that you learned about yourself in that process? And just as a person

Mike Cobb:

I learned one is that I mean, I am enneagram, eight, right? So I know that for me that I don't like that, right? I want to be able to challenge and ask an answer. And I learned that, that that's just part of my mentality. Sometimes that's really great for me that that makes me good at my job this past year, if I hadn't learned to be more vulnerable and step back from that kind of instinctual desire to be the answer. I was gonna get in a lot of trouble this year. Right? I was gonna try to create an answer when there wasn't one. And so that was the lesson I learned. And I feel like, even though there's still a lot of ambiguous things, and questions and things hovering above us right now, I feel like I've found myself and less challenging questions. And I would say, you know, I don't know. But But here is what we're doing to try to get to the bottom of that, or how we're working as a team to come up with the best solutions. And it's, it's just to me, it's really been a relief. And I honestly felt like through most of the year, though, the pressure was high, the stress was low, you know, I mean, and I don't know that everyone felt that way. And there were probably times where I probably showed a little differently, and I feel now on retrospection. But I really do feel like many times this year, I was able to not let the stress get to me as much as it had in the past because of this kind of Revelation.

Jason Ramsden:

But when you look back on last year, you talked about the stress and it not being as stressful. Where do you turn for for positivity? Where's that? Where do you look for the P and your GPS? Where does that come from? for you personally?

Mike Cobb:

Well, first of all, my faith is where I get my my positivity from is that I mean, I'm a believer, and I know that there's a, there's a positive outcome at the end of all this right, no matter what today holds, or whatever is in front of me that I know down the road, that I have faith and an outcome that will be glorious, and beautiful. But you know, also, just, I'm an educator, and I do challenge all the time that if you're an educator, and you can't go join the Optimist Club, you ought to quit. And I know that's a really challenging statement. But remember, I'm enneagram eight, but I just have a hard time because as an educator, you ought to be in this because you are absolutely an optimist, you have positivity, that what we're doing has an impact on others, the world's gonna be a better place because of what we do. And if you don't have that mentality, I don't know how you get up every day and do what we do. Because I, I believe this generation of kids is smarter, stronger, and more caring than the last one, right? And I believe they want to come in behind them is going to outpace them. And that's why I love what I do. You share you're not a closet enneagram two, because I'm a type two. So

Jason Ramsden:

you know, we're like servants, we just, that's how we go. We like to be hosts and hostesses. We like to help people. So last year, was I also agree it was a tough year. But it was also super satisfying, you know, having worked, you know, and led an IT team to get people through the hybrid model. It's it's just one of those things where I agree, if you're not in education, and you can't feel like you can be helpful and optimistic about what's coming next for our kids, then perhaps it's maybe time to think about making a switch. Exactly. I know, I may have some listeners out there who may not agree with me on that particular point. But I think you know, we're there to serve kids, and to teach them how to be resilient, how to be positive, how to have a growth mindset, that's going to change things for lots of people, the impact is going to be huge down there. Absolutely.

Mike Cobb:

Well, and I love your point. I mean, I have a lot of friends in all types of industries. And you know, they all don't agree with me that being a teacher and educator is the greatest gig you know, you have a quite a few in there like, I could never do what you do. But But I will tell you this, the people I try to surround myself were theorists passionate about whatever they do, as I am about education, and they see a positive influence and what they think it will do for the world, whether that means they're selling cars, or they're programming computers or whatever that is that they believe that what they're doing will possibly impact society and their community. And those are the people that I want to hang around with. Right. And I believe it's true. I believe all of us have that role and to make the world a better place.

Jason Ramsden:

Yeah, that's a great point. That's a great point. Again, it goes back to impact, right? We everybody sees how they impact the world differently and how they're going to go about it. I know if I asked you this question a year ago, or if I ask it to you a year from now, your answers may be different. But right now, what's, what's the biggest motivator in your life right now?

Mike Cobb:

Oh, wow. You know, for me, at our school, we have been casting some really bold visions about how we really want to see realize this idea of authentic learning student agency, as well as agile frameworks to really bring about, I think, education to your life. So I still I would answer that, that I just, I'm excited about every next step right now, you know, I mean, I, I have envisioned where it is going. And that I know that we are still along the path. And there's some really neat adventures. I know, there's some things already that we've mapped out that we're going to see more and more of as we walk down this path, but also know there's gonna be a few incredible natural wonders that just jump out along the journey that we're not expecting. And that's what I'm excited about. I love the adjacent possibilities that happen whenever you map out a great plan. So I'm excited about the known that's coming in front of us that we're planning for, and I'm excited about the unknown, that will also be probably some of the most glorious outcomes of all,

Jason Ramsden:

what are the plans in the future for both yourself and for for all saints? What's down the road?

Mike Cobb:

Yes. So you know, right now, we, I think I mentioned to you off air that we were, we have 13 major projects this summer that we are working on construction wise on campus. And we've been very busy over the last four years doing some the same things, we have built out outdoor learning classrooms, and this summer, we're adding three more outdoor learning cabins in our 15 acres in the woods we call the outdoor Learning Center. And so you know, I'm excited about having our students leave a traditional classroom setting and actually literally go out into the woods for their classroom experience. And to see that happening. So for us, we have several things that we're living out every day. And we are launching something that we just got funded with EA Ford, and what we're calling a three learning and a three learning is looking at authentic learning agency and agile frameworks that help schools better achieve what they want to do, and especially in those outcomes for students and relevant learning. And so we'll be launching this this year, where we're going to be putting on a workshop here for teachers, but more importantly for students to come and talk about those three A's. And then also helping people go out and present these at conferences and share as well as creating this network, kind of a gamified approach to leveling up so that as people become a three students or teachers, they get certified and what this means so they can share that information and those resources with others. So we're really excited about what that's going to look like. And we're thankful for EA Ford and having confidence in us and funding this project going forward.

Jason Ramsden:

You mentioned the phrase agile framework for my listeners who don't know what that is, as it pertains to education. One of the positive sides of having an agile framework,

Mike Cobb:

we really, we base a lot of our agile work from off the book Scrum, which a lot of people are familiar with. So it really helps, I think, put context to it. We've created our own way of scrumming. We do have Scrum masters here and, and such. But we've created a system that we're we're able to move away from that watershed problem solving that used to be the way that not only schools but many industries use as their way of solving you know that we have to contemplate every last detail and every possible problem to the overall solution before we move forward. Schools though, I believe were absolutely the the worst at this like that we had to have everything run through a committee, we had to know exactly how it would look for a teacher, a student, a parent. And then we had to go back and we had to do two more rounds of that committee then we had to create a glossy and then by the time we were finished, all the kids we had dreamed this up for had already graduated from our school, we might be implemented. Right. And so one of the things that our school has helped us move so fast is that we are using the Agile the scrum framework to make us move fast. We don't have to know everything about what it will look like we have to know what our immediate problems are. We're trying to solve what are those opportunities in front of us? Right behind me here is our main Scrum board for the campus. And it's not real full right now because it is we just launched it this week for this coming school year. But we've averaged about 80 campus wide initiatives since I've been here each year. And that's because one the Agile process lets us just tackle problems. We don't have to know all the answers. And then secondly, it allows us to do it incrementally and as a team and that's something I love about our system and about both agile frameworks is that you don't have to wait on The owner, I mean, the middle school head may not be the person who is raising a question that might solve a middle school problem. It could be someone else on the team that creates a strong team around that particular issue. And so, you know, it gives agency to our team. And that is something that I believe is vital as well is that you know, you have to have people that are working to solve what they're most passionate about around campus. And a teacher that's teaching history should care about history and teach that class, but that's just an avenue for them to be a leader on campus and other places, right. So why not let them lead an outdoor learning challenge or something else, that they're also passionate about that

Jason Ramsden:

the scrum framework really helps with distributing leadership? Yes, right. Many people, which I have always found a wonderful way to get people involved in engaged. And again, going back to what we were talking about earlier, having an impact where they may not have otherwise had an impact and absence, I bring that to the table at your school. I would like to get to know you just a little bit better. So what's something you've always wanted to do? But you haven't done?

Mike Cobb:

Oh, wow. So I'm a big car guy. I'm a car enthusiast. And so I actually have a couple of garages, I have a small garage at my house. And then I have a shop that I actually have built over the last few years here where I have some major projects. So I I love cars. And it's my my one thing, I love school. And so I literally would work all the time, because I do enjoy it. But I've learned that's not healthy. And so my shop has become this great release for me, especially as my wife and I become empty nesters. So one of the things that is on my bucket list that my wife and I actually had planned to do until the pandemic hit was we're going to do a tour of Europe where we go on a supercar tour, we actually for 10 days drive 10 different supercars and get to disco experience from the greatest roads and greatest cars in the world. And so that that's on my bucket list right now that we're hoping to do in the next 12 months.

Jason Ramsden:

Now, that's a great bucket list item, one I've heard before. And I think it's important to to have self care. It's an important part of being a leader port part of actually living life as right as ever ourselves. And I tell that to my listeners all the time going through different topics is that you need to be able to take care of yourself before you can take care of other people. So I'm glad that you found that time for yourself. What I would like to do like usually here, I like to wrap up sessions with two questions, guys, for those that I asked them all my guests something that I feel like closes out a show. And so what's something that most people don't know about you?

Mike Cobb:

I think that a lot of people don't know that I was in the Navy for 10 years, I served as a CB and the Navy working for the ninth Regiment, Marines. And, you know, we're honestly I went into the Navy because I needed to fund my college and the GI Bill helped me do that. But it has been one of those defining experiences in my life, I obviously didn't decide to become a, a career, military person. But I learned so much attention to detail. I learned about how to do systems. And then now in my role as Head of School doing construction projects for 10 years I was with a construction battalion. And oh my goodness, it comes in handy all the time. So yeah, a lot of people don't know that very different part of my world war, a uniform for 10 years, and now wear a bow tie every day. So very different.

Jason Ramsden:

Very different. very different than and I did not know that about you. So I appreciate you sharing that with me. The final question. It's always a good one. I like people to fill in the blank to this question. But happiness is a

Mike Cobb:

Oh, wow. That's great. Okay, so happiness is a choice is what I'd say to that, that I believe that we all have a choice to see the upside to be positive no matter what's going on. One thing that I've shared with my daughter for for all her life is that I don't like the phrase, everything happens for a reason. I don't like that. I don't believe in that. That's just not doesn't help with me. But I do believe there is reason and everything that happens it's up to you to decide what that is. And so, you know, as I've gone through life, and certainly I've had challenges and things that have happened that weren't positive, I've chosen to try to find the reason in that to try to find what I can grow and learn from that or how I can use that wound that pain or whatever to help somebody else. And, and so that that's been a huge one for me. So I definitely believe happiness is a choice.

Jason Ramsden:

Like I don't think I could have closed the show any better than happiness is a choice. You choose to be happy. It is all about mindset. So thank you for for closing the show that way. People wanted to learn more about you or learn more about all saints in the work that you do. Where can they find you? How can they get in touch about the good work that you're doing?

Mike Cobb:

Well, I appreciate that. No, I'd love for people that Check out what we're doing at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler. And you can find our website at all das thinks.org. You can also follow me on twitter fun. The MC 01 is what my Twitter handle is. And again, we would love to have people come visit. So if anyone ever has the opportunity and would love to see what our expression of authentic learning students use looks like they have an open invitation anytime.

Jason Ramsden:

Sounds great. Mike, thank you so much for being on the show. I appreciate it.

Mike Cobb:

Thank you, Jason. I love your podcast. I'm a huge fan of you. But now positivity on fire. So thanks for putting out all that great work.

Jason Ramsden:

Wow, thanks for the kind word. All right, thank you. I think we all could use a little bit more grace, positivity and support in our lives. And the concept of GPS is a good one to help get us there. Here are three things I learned from my conversation with Mike today. One grace, positivity in support can bring a community together during times of high expectations. To mindset matters, especially optimism when working with school aged children in three, whether we want to believe it or not. Happiness, my friends, is a choice. If you liked today's episode, please give us a five star rating wherever you listen. And please share this episode as word of mouth is the only way this shows message grows. And finally, as I close every show, thank you for being here today, my friends, your gift of time listening to the show means the world to me. And as always be well be happy, be you and until next time, may your quest for positivity begin today.

Mike Cobb:

I tell you a great story. A student named jet who was a great musician had been using some of our Fab Lab resources but really cared more about music but he developed a problem with his hand where when he was strumming for long gigs, he couldn't grip the guitar pick anymore. So he decided he was going to figure out how to solve his problem. He created this really cool device that held the guitar pick that you didn't have to have grip strength it basically went through your hands like a ring.

Jason Ramsden:

For more on my positivity quest to follow me at underscore j y Ramsden on Instagram tik tok and Twitter. If you like today's episode, please give us a five star rating and review on your favorite podcast app or visit JC comm and search for positivity on fire. Positivity on fire is a production of impact one media LLC All rights reserved.